Sutton
towermill


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Norfolk Windmills


c.1920
c.1920

Sutton mill was built in 1789 with 8 floors. When it was rebuilt after the fire of 1861 an additional floor was added and the common sails were replaced by patent sails. The nine storey mill was topped by a traditional Norfolk boat shaped cap and had a gallery and petticoat. By 2005, Sutton mill had become by far the tallest remaining windmill in the county.


Sutton's 9 storey tower was about 67' 6" to the curb and 79' 6" to the top of the Norfolk boat shaped cap with a chain pole. The stocks were 12ins. square at the centre. The four double shuttered sails, struck by rack and pinion had a span of 73 feet and were 9ft. 4ins. wide. Each sail had 9 bays of 3 shutters and at one time they were recorded with 10 bays of 3 shutters.
The left handed, 10 bladed fantail, was 12 feet in diameter.
The windshaft was 18ins. diameter at its neck and 13ins. at the brakewheel.
The 9ft. diameter, 8 armed brakewheel was made of iron with 88 cogs and the shanks were dovetail wedged.
The brake lever had a multiplying gear that was used to increase the mechanical advantage, to produce a ratio of 4
½ to 1.
The cast iron wallower on the 8th (dust) floor had 31 cogs.
The stone nuts with 30 teeth were the largest iron mortise nuts Rex Wailes had ever seen.
Four pairs of stones were situated on the 6th floor although Harry Apling mentions that they were on the 5th floor and that by 1926 a further pair of stones were set on the 2nd floor.
The sack hoist was driven by a belt from below using a pulley to drum connection via a universal joint to correct the alignment from the drive supplied by the crown wheel on the 7th floor.


On the sixth floor of the tower there were 4 sets of stones, more than any other mill in the country. The walls were over 3 feet thick, the tower outside diameter was 33 feet and the diameter at the curb was 16 feet.


Unusually, the 8 storey mill was built on the site of an earlier towermill that burnt down in 1789. When rebuilt, the mill was large enough to use 4 common sails to power 4 pairs of stones, 2 flour mills, jumper and cylinder. However, by 1858, the common sails had been replaced by 4 patent sails. A stage was set around the tower on the 5th floor.


In 1857 the mill was producing 10 to 12 score or lasts per week, this being equal to 200 to 240 coomb sacks, meaning each pair of stones was producing 50 to 60 coombs per week.
In 1858 production had increased to 12 to 14 lasts per week, being equal to 240 to 280 coomb sacks, each set of stones thus producing 60 to 70 coombs each.


c.1930
c.1930

11th September 1934
11th September 1934

The mill suffered a serious fire in 1861 and was then hit by lightning on Monday 4th July 1875 at 4.00 p.m. with the lightning bolt hitting one of the sails and then passing down through the centre of the mill via the sack chain. Some of the staff were within three feet of the chain at the time but escaped injury. However, the mill was again struck by lightning in 1940 when the sails were hit, causing a fire. The mill, which by this time had given up grinding corn and was exclusively producing animal feed, ceased to work from that time.


23rd October 1970 19th May 1980
23rd October 1970
19th May 1980

Whereas I, William Read of Sutton, Innkeeper, having rescued a Mare belonging to me, distrained by Mr. John Bygrave, junior, damage feasant and also abused the said Mr. Bygrave, who in consideration of my paying one pound, to be distributed in bread to the poor of the said parish of Sutton, and expences and asking the said Mr. Bygrave's pardon, publicaly, has declined commencing actions for the above offences; I do therefore hereby beg the said Mr. Bygrave's pardon accordingly.
Witness
George Rust WM. READ
Norfolk Chronicle - 29th May 1813

August 1982
August 1982

WANTED IMMEDIATELY
A JOURNEYMAN MILLER.
Apply to Mr. John Bygrave, Sutton Mill.
N.B. A Single man will be preferred.

Norfolk Chronicle - 19th August 1815

WANTED Now or at Michaelmas next
A JOURNEYMAN MILLER, one who perfectly understands his business and can write a good plain hand, may meet with constant employ,
By applying to John Bygrave, Sutton Mills, Norfolk.
N.B. A Single man will be preferred.

Norfolk Chronicle - 20th September 1817

Thomas Goose's Creditors
Thomas Goose of Hickling, Farmer assigned personal Estate and Effects to John Bygrave of Sutton, Miller for benefit of creditors.
Deed of Assignment ...

Norfolk Chronicle - 15th December 1821

Brakewheel - August 1982 Windshaft - August 1982
Brakewheel - August 1982
Windshaft - August 1982

Upright shaft - August 1982 Gearing to horizontal shaft - August 1982
Upright shaft - August 1982
Gearing to horizontal shaft - August 1982

Stonefloor - August 1982
Stonefloor - August 1982

To Millwrights
Any Persons that are desirous of Contracting for the Building of a TOWER WINDMILL on the premises of William Warner Esq. are desired to send their Proposals free of postage to the Kings Arms Inn, North Walsham on the 3rd day of December next.
N.B. For a Plan of the Work etc. apply to Mr. John Bygrove, Sutton Mills, Norfolk.

Norfolk Chronicle - 20th & 27th November 1824

Tithe Award 1842
Map. Pratt & Son, Surveyors, Norwich, 1841
Owner: John Bygrave
Occupier: John Bygrave

Mill shown on

No. 204
No. 205
No. 206

Malt House Piece mill
Gardens
House, Yards & Premises

Part of

42a. 0r. 3p.

£19. -. 6

Mill shown as large towermill with a stage.
The Award also included Ingham_postmill that was just inside the same parish.


August 1982
August 1982

To Millers and Maltsters
SUTTON near Stalham. to be let
For a term of years and entered upon immediately
A very capital TOWER WINDMILL having eight floors, driving four pairs of stones and fitted up with all necessary Machinery, capable of doing from 10 to 12 score per week.
Also a 20 coomb Steep Malting House adjoining with Barley Bins and all requisite Storerooms.
A good trade has been carried on for many years upon the above Premises which are situate in a populous neighbourhood within three quarters of a mile of the navigable river and about one mile from Stalham where an excellent corn market has been established and is well attended being one of the finest districts for corn in Norfolk.
etc. etc.
Apply to Mr. Bygrave at the Brewery or to Mr. John Bygrave, jun. at the Mill, Sutton, near Stalham.
Norfolk Chronicle - 10th October & Norfolk News - 26th September & 3rd October 1857


To be Let
A Superior Windmill, Malting, excellent Family Residence, Agricultural Buildings and about 90 acres of Land
SUTTON, near Stalham.
Wm. Spelman & Sons are instructed by the Proprietor, Mr. Bygrave to let for a Term with possession at Michaelmas next the following important Mercantile PROPERTY situate at Sutton.
A Brick Tower Windmill, eight floors in height with four patent sails drives four pairs of stones, two flour mills, jumper, cylinder, two meal hoppers holding about twelve sacks each, also a counting-room, barley store, granaries, paint shop and large store room.
A Malting of 25 coomb steep, kilns, drying room, malt office and stores.
Residence ...
Agricultural Buildings ...
and 90 acres in Sutton and Hickling.
The above Property offers many advantages. The Mill stands well for wind, has superior tackle of every description and is capable of doing from 12 - 14 lasts per week.
etc.
Particulars of the Proprietor, Sutton, Stalham, and of Messrs. Spelman, Norwich and Yarmouth.
Norfolk Chronicle & Norfolk News - 31st July, 14th August 1858


To be Let
A Superior Windmill, Malting, excellent Family Residence, Agricultural Buildings and about 90 acres of Land
SUTTON, near Stalham.
Wm. Spelman & Sons are instructed by the Proprietor, Mr. Bygrave to let for a Term with possession at Michaelmas next the following important Mercantile PROPERTY situate at Sutton.
A Brick Tower Windmill, eight floors in height with four patent sails drives four pairs of stones, two flour mills, jumper, cylinder, two meal hoppers holding about twelve sacks each, also a counting-room, barley store, granaries, paint shop and large store room.
A Malting of 25 coomb steep, kilns, drying room, malt office and stores.
An excellent Family Residence (a part of which the proprietor will retain if desired), spacious Agricultural Buildings, Cottage and about 83 acres Arable Land and Marshes.
Particulars may be had of Messrs. Keith, Blake & Keith, Solicitors, Norwich and of the Auctioneers, Norwich and Yarmouth.
Norfolk Chronicle & Norfolk News - 4th September 1858


Mill and Cart horses etc.
SUTTON near Stalham
On Thursday October 7th.
The FARMING STOCK and other property of Mr. J. Bygrave, Junior, upon the premises in his occupation at Sutton next Stalham ...
Sale to commence at 12 o'c at noon punctually.
Norfolk News - 2nd October 1858


To Painters
Any Person wishing to contract for the PAINTING of a large WINDMILL and other work at the Parish of Sutton, are requested to apply to John Bygrave, New Brewery of the same place.
Norfolk News - 16th July 1859


Situations Vacant
TO MILLERS
WANTED, a strong active Single Man as MILLER
Apply to T. Worts, Sutton or at Stand No. 51, Corn Hall, Norwich.
Norfolk News - 11th November 1871


SUTTON - THUNDERSTORM
Mr J. Worts' wind mill was struck by lightning, considerably damaging one sail. The electric fluid appears to have struck the sail, then entered the mill on the sack tackling chain to the first floor, shattering a large beam and joint then made its escape by the door to the ground floor. Mr Worts' son and six men had a miraculous escape. They were standing together within two or three feet of the hole that was shattered and none received any injury. They were all very much frightened and some appeared quite stunned, but soon recovered.
Local newspaper -19th July 1875


August 1992
August 1992

SUTTON. Thunderstorm.
On Monday (19th) about four, a very severe thunderstorm broke over the parish of Sutton and continued for some time, accompanied with heavy rain. Mr J. Worts' windmill was struck by the lightning. One sail was considerably damaged. The electric fluid appears to have struck the sail, then entered the mill at the neck and passed down the centre of the mill in the sack tackling chain to the first floor. It then made its way down the chain, cut a hole through the boarded floor, shattering a large beam joist and made its escape by the door of the ground floor. Mr Worts' son and six men had a miraculous escape. They were standing together within two or three feet of the hole that was shattered and none received any injury, they were all very much frightened and some appeared quite stunned, but soon recovered.
Norfolk News - 24th July 1875


AGIST STOCK
LUDHAM HALL MARSHES
A LIMITED number of HORSE STOCK taken in for the season from 12 May to November 1st. Yearlings 60s.; 2 year old 70s.; 3 year old 80s.
Apply T. Worts, Sutton Mill, Stalham.
Eastern Daily Press - 11th & 12th April 1894


Windshaft inside the cap 4th June 2004 Gearing to a belt drive 4th June 2004
Windshaft inside the cap 4th June 2004
Gearing to a belt drive 4th June 2004

Brakewheel and wallower 4th June 2004 Stone tuns 4th June 2004
Brakewheel and wallower 4th June 2004
Stone tuns 4th June 2004

re Fire at Stalham_smock_mill:-
Such a fire in this district has not occured since 1861 when Mr. T. Worts' mill at Sutton was totally destroyed.
Eastern Daily Press - 7th January 1903


The tallest windmill still standing in Britain is the nine storey Sutton Mill in Norfolk, built in 1853 which before being struck by lightning in 1941 had sails 73 ft. in diameter with 216 shutters.
Guinness Book of Records - 1982


The mill was bought by Chris Nunn in 1975 and was restored to become a museum in its own right, quite apart from the Broads Museum housed in the surrounding complex. The Broads Museum housed an incredible collection of artifacts from a variety of trades and collections including old domestic utensils, kitchen appliances, woodworking tools, razors, leather trades, soaps & cleaners, trade tricycles, veterinary & animal instruments, traps, historical tobacco products, large engines, marsh & water implements, early cameras, TV's & radios and a complete Victorian pharmacy.


Chris Nunn did much to restore the mill including the installation of new Honduran pine stocks. However by 2004, the mill was beginning to become dilapidated and was in need of a considerable amount of restoration work.


EDP advert 23rd July 1983
EDP advert 23rd July 1983

I went to Sutton mill in about 2004 and it was in a serious condition and there was quite a lot of problems. The staging was rotten and access was forbidden and there was a lot of rot in places. The cap leaked like a colander and if you wanted to access the fan-stage you had to use stairs created from 2 Workmates, several boxes and the windshaft itself and then the stage itself had a lot of rot and looked unsafe.
Andrew White - 21st July 2006


Kitchen apparatus in the Broads Museum - August 1982 Marshmen's tools in the Broads Museum - August 1982
Kitchen apparatus in the Broads Museum - August 1982
Marshmen's tools in the Broads Museum - August 1982

Victorian pharmacy in the Broads Museum 6th June 2004
Victorian pharmacy in the Broads Museum 6th June 2004

Eastern Daily Press Wednesday 11th May 2005: Mill and museum advertised for sale as going concern


It is one of the tallest windmills in the country and could be a spectacular icon of the Broads, as it was for many years. Instead, Sutton Mill is looking considerably the worse for wear and there are no signs of it returning to a good condition any time soon. The grade II* listed mill near Stalham is a key Norfolk building but is on the county council’s Buildings at Risk Register because it is deemed to have been under-maintained for years and is not watertight. The upper floors are unsafe to enter, the traditional Norfolk boat-shaped cap is leaky and the sails are broken. It hasn't been in use as a working mill since 1940, when it was producing animal feed having ceased
flour production sometime earlier. For 30 years Chris Nunn owned the mill on New Road and its surrounding buildings, using the site to house his Museum of the Broads until he sold up a couple of years ago. Last year the mill and its surrounding complex were taken over by the bygones museum Yesterday’s World. Manager Andy Glynn, who is based at Yarmouth, said last August: “We have only just taken over - we opened in April - and as far as our plans are concerned we will look at it properly in the winter.” But last week he said that no progress had been made.
Keiron Pim, Eastern Daily Press - 9th July 2008


6th June 2004
6th June 2004

In 2007 the upper floors of the Grade II listed mill were designated as being unsafe for visitors. Full restoration was estimated at requiring an investment of around £500,000.


Yesterday's World Sutton Windmill and Broads Museum

It is with regret that Yesterdays World have decided to close Sutton Windmill and Broads Museum permanently as from 26th September 2008.
It has been a difficult year of trading, and the operating costs we have incurred have meant that this has become a less than viable operation. No further decision has been made as to the relocation of the collections in the Museum at this time.
Statement on Sutton Mill website - September 2008


Chunks of timber have been falling from the wooden cap of Grade II listed Sutton Mill, near Stalham, according to neighbour and parish council chairman Linda Matthews.
North Norfolk District Council (NNDC) experts say the 79.5ft-tall mill is not a safety risk and the mill's owners warn they cannot afford the six-figure sum needed fully to restore the 18th-century mill - but both have pledged to work together in a bid to preserve an important piece of Norfolk's heritage.
“It should be an asset to Sutton and Norfolk, but it's becoming an eyesore,” said Ms Matthews,
The nine-storey mill is on the county council's Buildings at Risk Register because of a lack of maintenance. Its upper floors are unsafe, it is not water-tight and the sails are broken.
For 30 years, until 2006, it was visited by up to 20,000 people annually in its guise as The Sutton Windmill and Broads Museum, run by Chris Nunn and housing his huge collection of bygone artefacts.
The mill now belongs to Yesterday's World, an East Sussex-based company which runs historical attractions, including one on Yarmouth's Marine Parade.
Carl Partridge, chief executive of the Yesterday's World group, said they had tried to keep it open as a tourist attraction but it had become economically unviable.
“Within the first month of opening it became quite clear why it wouldn't work,” said Mr Partridge.
It was off the tourist trail, poorly signed and down narrow roads, in an isolated rural area which was not designed to cope with large numbers of people.
Yesterday's World, which closed the mill to the public in 2008, had realised that it would need at least £500,000 of restoration work.
“Unfortunately we don't have half a million sitting in our pocket,” said Mr Partridge. “And in my experience it wouldn't stop there. That would turn into £1m and then there would be the annual running costs.”
Yesterday's World recognised the importance of the mill and wanted to safeguard its future, he added. He was seeking talks with NNDC to try and find a solution which would both preserve and find a use for the building.
But Jonathan Neville, of the Friends of Norfolk Mills, warned that the current economic climate meant public funding for such projects was drying up fast.
“Its loss would be a great shame. It's a unique and iconic building which can be seen for miles around and we're very worried about it,” said Mr Neville.
Norfolk County Council will vote on Monday on a package of proposed cuts which would see the Norfolk Windmills Trust lose all of its annual £70,000 funding from 2012.
The mill was “generally structurally sound”, although the cap was in particular need of repair to make it wind and water tight, according to Chris Young, senior conservation and design officer with NNDC.

Mr Young also said they would continue talking to the owners, and to English Heritage, in a bid to find answers.
Alex Hurrell, Eastern Daily Press - Wednesday 9th February 2011

Eastern Daily Press - 8th September 2012
Eastern Daily Press - 8th September 2012

5th August 2014 5th August 2014
Mill complex with deteriorating mill cap 5th August 2014

5th August 2014
5th August 2014

Action team tackling eyesore buildings across north Norfolk
A landmark windmill is the latest target of an action team aiming to tackle north Norfolk's eyesores and neglected properties.

Work is already being carried out to make crumbling Sutton Mill near Stalham, safe after chunks of timber fell from the cap after winter storms.
Now talks are under way between officials and the owners to carry out further conservation work to the tallest mill in the county.
The moves to save the former tourist attraction and museum comes after a string of other success stories by the district council's enforcement board, which has made progress on 62 out of 102 long-term probnlem buildings in the area, some of which have been disused for 20 years.

Sutton Mill action
Sutton Mill, which dates back to the 18th-century, has been empty since 2008 and the Grade 2 listed structure is on English Heritage’s buildings at risk register. The enforcement board stepped in after last winter’s storms caused sections of timber to fall from the 79.5ft-tall mill’s cap. Some chunks landed close to neighbouring properties. In January a section of the Weavers Way public footpath running beside the mill was diverted to protect walkers from possible injury.Council officers have used a warrant to get on to the site and assess it, then contacted the owners who had engaged the millwrights to advise NNDC, said council director Nick Baker. Minor safety works had been carried out and a timetable of work needing to be done was being drawn up. Mr Baker expected “significant improvement works to the capping and structure.”
The mill was bought in 2006 by the company Yesterday’s World which ran it as an historical attraction. But the firm closed it two years later, saying it was unviable. The News was unable to contact the owners.
Alex Hurrell, EDP24 - Thursday 29th May 2014

October 2014
October 2014
The mill built in 1789 originally had eight floors. When it was re-built after the fire of 1861 another floor was added to take it to its current height.
During the past month the mill has had its stocks taken off along with the cap. New sails and cap will hopefully be made and refitted by the owners.
To the surprise of locals, no attempt was made to retain the cap ribs, and fan carriage as patterns, which is likely to make restoration more difficult.

Mill News - Mills Section of the Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings - October 2014

1789: Mill built

Faden's map 1797: Windmill

1813: John Bygrave, miller (snr snr)

1815: John Bygrave, miller (snr snr)

1817: John Bygrave, miller (snr snr)

1821: John Bygrave, miller (snr snr)

Bryant's map 1826: Windmill

Index of Wills 1828: John Bygrave of Hickling, formerly of Sutton (snr snr)

Greenwood's map 1834: Windmill

White's 1836: John Bygrave, miller & maltster (snr)

O.S. map 1838: Windmill

Census 1841: John Bygrave snr (55) miller
Ann  Bygrave (55)
John Bygrave jnr (20)
? Barker (20)
George Ives (45) auctioneer
Ann Ives (40) b.outside Norfolk
? Knights (20) female servant
Martha Miller (15) servant
Robert Hunt (20) journeyman miller
John Thaxter (15) servant

White's 1845: John Bygrave jnr, miller & maltster

1845: John Bygrave jnr, miller, farmer, maltster & spirit merchant

Census 1851: John Bygrave jnr (30) b.Sutton, maltster & farmer of 80 acres employing 5 labourers
Hannah  Bygrave (28) b.Metfield, Suffolk, farmers wife
Ann  Bygrave (70) b.Hempstead, mother
Hannah A. Bygrave (5) b.Sutton
John Bygrave (3) b.Sutton
Robert J. Bygrave (2) b.Sutton
Mary Burton (67) b.Ingham, nurse
Emily Scarland (14) b.Hickling, servant
Elizabeth Amess (21) b.Catfield, house servant
Susan Baker (18) b.Palling, dairy servant
Robert Stearman (23) b.Stalham, miller servant
John Stearman (20) b.Stalham, apprentice miller
William Chapman (15) b.Hickling, general servant

White's 1854: Jonas Bygrave, victualler & brewer, windmill

October 1857: Mill advertised to be let

October 1858: Mill and farming stock of John Bygrave advertised for sale

1859: John Bygrave, miller & brewer

Census 1861:

Thomas Worts (33) b.Lessingham, miller employing 2 men, & 2 boys, farmer of 235 acres employing 10 men & 9 boy labs and (undecipherable trade) employing 1 male
Hannah Worts (35) b.Hasbro
Hannah Worts (6) b.Lessingham, scholar
Elizabeth Worts (5) b.Lessingham
Sarah Worts (4) b.Lessingham
Thomas Worts (2) b.Lessingham
Mary Worts (11 mths) b.Sutton.
Ann Johnson (61) b.Hempstead, visitor, widow formerly farmer’s wife
Rachel Kirk (20) b.Starston, teacher
George Thaxter Page (24) b.Hickling, assistant in the mill
Thomas Woolston (17) b.Ingham, apprentice assistant in the mill
Richard Gibbs (15) b.Ridlington, apprentice assistant in the mill
Mary Grimmer (17) b.East Ruston, dairy maid
Elizabeth Storey (16) b.Hasbro, nursemaid
Robert Belson (20) b.Catfield, carter
Address: Mill House


Census 1861:

Isaac Hunt (44) b.Long Stratton, miller (previously working at Forncett End)
Eunice Hunt (38) b.Tacleston
Louisa Hunt (13) b.Forncett
Susan Hunt (10) b.Forncett
James Hunt (6) b.Dilham
Address: Next door to Thomas Worts


1861: Mill destroyed by fire and was later rebuilt by by millwrights, England of Ludham

1862: Mill rebuilt by millwrights, England of Ludham who replaced the common sails with patent sails

White's 1864: Thomas Worts, corn miller & merchant

1875: J. Wort, miller

4th July 1875: Mill struck by lightning

Kelly's 1879: Thomas Worts, miller & farmer


Census 1881: Thomas Worts (53) b.Lessingham, farmer of 1,000 acres empl 29 labourers and 11 boys
Hannah Worts (55) b.Happisburgh
Bessie Worts (25) b.Lessingham
Thomas Worts jnr (23) b.Lessingham
Augustine Worts (19) b.Sutton
Mary Ann Postle (16) b.Hempstead, housemaid
Emily Walpole (25) b.Edingthorpe, dairy servant
All living at Mill House

White's 1883: Thomas Worts, miller & farmer, & corn, seed, cake & manure merchant, & maltster, & brick, tile, & c. manufacturer, Sutton mill

O.S. map 1884: Windmill

Kelly's 1892: Thomas Worts, miller (wind), farmer, maltster, corn merchant & brick & tile maker, Sutton mill

Kelly's 1896: Thomas Worts, miller (wind), farmer, maltster, corn merchant & brick & tile maker, Sutton mill

Kelly's 1900: Thomas Worts, miller (wind), farmer, maltster, corn merchant & brick & tile maker, Sutton mill

Kelly's 1904: Thomas Worts, miller (wind), farmer, maltster, corn merchant & brick & tile maker, Sutton mill

Kelly's 1908: Thomas Worts, miller (wind), farmer, Sutton mill

Kelly's 1912: Thomas Worts, miller (wind), Sutton mill

1915: Thomas Worts died at the age of 87

Kelly's 1916: Frank Worts, miller (wind), Sutton mill

Kelly's 1922: Frank Worts, miller (wind), Sutton mill

Kelly's 1925: Frank Worts, miller (wind), Sutton mill

Kelly's 1929: Frank Worts, miller (wind) & corn dealer, Sutton mill. TN Stalham 4X2

Kelly's 1933: Frank Worts, miller (wind) & corn dealer, Sutton mill. TN Stalham 251

Kelly's 1937: Frank Worts, farmer, miller (wind) & corn dealer, Sutton mill. TN Stalham 251 (over 150 acres)

Karl Wood painting 1937: Mill shown to be in working order

1
940: Mill struck by lightning, damaging the sails and causing a fire. Commercial operation then ceased

O.S. map 1974: Windmill

1975: Mill bought from Worts family by Chris Nunn and restored to become part of the Broads Museum

Guinness Book of Records 1982: Sutton Mill recorded as tallest mill still standing in Britain

11th May 2005: Mill and museum advertised for sale as going concern

October 2006: Mill bought by Yesterday's World - Les & Tara Haines, managers

26th September 2008: Mill and Broads Museum closed for business

Saturday 8th September 2012: Bygone Museum contents advertised for sale by auction by TW Gaze

May 2014: Work being carried out to make cap safer as wood had been falling from it

September 2014: Cap removed and temporary ? flat roof installed


If you have any memories, anecdotes or photos please let us know and we may be able to use them to update the site. By all means telephone 01263 713658 or

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