Heigham
Crook's Place
towermill


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Norfolk Windmills


Crook's Place towermill was also sometimes known as New City Mill


The following advertisment possibly related to the mill site


TO MILLERS

ANY Person desirous of erecting a TOWER WIND-MILL, upon an advantageous spot near Norwich which will be Let for the purpose upon a Long Lease, at a very moderate rent, and chief of the money to be laid out in erecting the same may be had of the Lessor on Mortgage, will be pleased to apply to Messrs. Jay and Cremer, Solicitors, Norwich.
Norfolk Chronicle - 30th July 1825

Henry Lock built the mill, which was advertised as newly erected in February 1826


TO MILLERS
TO BE SOLD OR LET
With Immediate Possession,

A Newly-erected BRICK TOWER WINDMILL, containing seven floors, fitted up with every convenience, with three pair of French Stones, two flour mills, jumpers, &c. &c. with patent sails of sufficient power to drive all the machinery, and capable of carrying on a very extensive trade, situated in a populous neighbourhood, commanding a large retail trade in the immediate vicinity of Norwich, and within a quarter of a mile of the navigable river – The Mill claims many advantages; the whole can be obtained by keeping one horse.
For particulars enquire of Mr. Lock, Millwright and Engineer, St. Andrew’s, Norwich

Norfolk Chronicle - 25th February 1826


The mill was marked on the 1830 map. Arthur Bayfield was listed in Pigot’s Directory of 1830, also running the Pockthorpe towermill. The mill was marked on the 1834 map and was to let in May of that year.


To be LET on LEASE

THE TOWER WIND MILL, in Crook’s Place, Norwich, late in the occupation of Mr. Bayfield, with immediate possession. This Mill contains eight floors, (including the ground floor), drives three pair of Stones, and is capable of grinding 4000 coombs of wheat per annum.
There is an excellent Granary with three stalled Stable attached, and the premises are walled in all round. For rent and further particulars apply to Messrs. Adam Taylor and Son, Solicitors, Norwich.
Norfolk Chronicle - 17th May 1834


James Peck was the next miller and his mother died on the 8th February 1835.


DIED

Sunday last, at Thorpe, near this city, Mrs. Mary Peck, aged 70, late of Wacton, and mother of
Mr. John Peck, miller, of Crook’s Place.

Norfolk Chronicle - 14th February 1835


The mill was marked on the 1838 map. Anthony Freestone was the miller in 1839. He was listed in Blyth’s Directory of 1842 as miller at New City, with a home in Peafield. Charles John Harvey followed him in 1845. The mill was marked on the 1848 map and was again to let in September of that year.


CROOK'S PLACE MILL
TO BE LET
And Entered upon immediately

A substantially-built Brick TOWER WINDMILL, with Patent Sails, driving three pairs of stones, with the stable and granary attached thereto, Situate in Heigham, Norwich.
Apply to Messrs. Adam Taylor and Sons, Solicitors, Norwich; and to view the Mill, to Mr. Harvey, Grocer, St. Stephen’s Gates, Norwich.

Norfolk Chronicle - 2nd September 1848


James Dye was listed in Hunt and Co.’s Directory of 1850 as miller at Crooks Place. In 1850, Miles Blomfield, who was also running the watermill as Keswick, took the mill. He was born c.1802 at Forncett St. Peter, Norfolk and in 1851 was given as a miller and farmer of 20 acres at Keswick employing 11 men,
1 apprentice and three boys. He was listed in White’s Directory of 1854 as a miller in Union Street. The mill was to let in October 1861.


Hugh King b.Poringland, was listed as a miller in the census of 1851 and was living in Mill Street, Hamlet of Heigham. He was a journeyman miller and would have been working for William Harrison Wells. Prior to moving to Heigham, Hugh King had worked at Horsham_St_Faith_watermill; his son Walter King, was recorded as working at Keswick mill in the same census before moving to Sculthorpe mill by 1871.


WINDMILL, NORWICH,
TO BE LET
THE CROOK’S PLACE WINDMILL,

For Rent and Particulars apply to Mr. Clement Taylor, Solicitor, Orford Place, Norwich, or
Mr. Miles Blomfield, Keswick.

Norfolk Chronicle - 5th October 1861


The mill was again advertised to be let in March 1867.


WINDMILL, NORWICH

THE CROOK’S PLACE MILL TO BE LET, with Possession at Lady-day next, or sooner if required. For Particulars apply to Mr. Clement Taylor, Solicitor, Orford Place, Norwich.
Norfolk Chronicle - 2nd March 1867


Miles Blomfield was listed in White’s Directory of 1868 as a corn miller in Chapel Street, Crook’s Place.


William Harrison Wells was the next miller, having previously run Hellesdon watermill and New Mills, both of which he continued to run along with the windmill. He was born c.1802 in Martham, Norfolk. From 1836 to 1850 he was at Dilham watermill. In 1851 he was given as a miller aged 49 living in Lower Hellesdon Road, Hellesdon with his wife Harriette (39), sons John Robert (16), Thomas Edward (14), Raymond Albert (11), Julian Trivanion (10), Henry Wallace (8) and Frederic Rising (1), daughter Ellen Rising (6) and his mother Sarah (73).


In 1861 William Harrison Wells was given as a miller aged 55 employing 35 men and 1 boy living in Hellesdon with his wife Harriette (59), sons Thomas E. (23), Julian T. (20) and Frederick R. (11) and daughters Ellen R. (16) and Rosalie H. (9) and his mother Sarah (85).


Hugh King b.Poringland, was listed as a miller in the census of 1861 and was living in Chapel Street, Heigham. He was a journeyman miller and would have been working for William Harrison Wells. Prior to moving to Heigham, Hugh King had worked at Horsham_St_Faith_watermill; his son, Walter King, was recorded as working at Keswick mill in the same census before moving to Sculthorpe mill by 1871.


William Harrison Wells' eldest daughter was married on the 1st October 1868.


MARRIED

SPILLING – WELLS – On the 1st inst., at Hellesdon, by the Rev. B. Rising, Uncle of the bride, assisted by the Rev. Hinds Howell, Rector of Hellesdon and Drayton, William Henry Spilling, of Stockwell Park-road, London, to Ellen Rising, eldest daughter of Mr. W. H. Wells.
Norfolk Chronicle - 3rd October 1868


William Harrison Wells was bankrupt in 1870


THE BANKRUPTCY AMENDMENT ACT, 1868

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that WILLIAM HARRISON WELLS, of the City of Norwich, Flour Miller, has left in the Office of the Chief Registrar of the Court of Bankruptcy, Quality Court, Chancery Lane, London, a list of his Property and Credits, as required by the Bankruptcy Amendment Act, 1868.
Dated this 5 th day of January, 1870;
WILLIAM SUTTON PAGE,
Guildhall Chambers, St. Peter’s Street, Norwich.
Solicitor for the Person Registering the Deed.

Norfolk Chronicle - 8th January 1870


In 1871 William Harrison Wells was given as a miller aged 65 living in Gildengate Street, St. George’s Colegate with his wife Harriette (60), and sons John Robert (36), Raymond Albert (31), Julian Turanion (30), Frederic Rising (21) and daughter Rosalie Harriette (19). Also living with him was his mother Sarah aged 84.


William Harrison Wells’ wife Harriette died in July 1871


DIED.

WELLS. – On the 16 th inst., after a long affliction, Harriette, the beloved wife of W. H. Wells, of St. George’s, in this city, deeply regretted.
Norfolk Chronicle - 22nd July 1871


William Harrison Wells took a lease on the City Flour Mills (steam) in September 1871. The mills were situated in St. George’s. In October 1872, Potter Batson, one of his employees at New Mills, was caught stealing flour. He was sentenced to two months Hard Labour.


The mill was marked on the 1874 map and William Harrison Wells died in December 1874.


DIED.

WELLS. – On the 30th ult., at Stoke Holy Cross, William Harrison Wells, late of St. George’s, in this city, aged 69.
Norfolk Chronicle - 9th January 1875


Wells Brothers were listed in Hamilton’s Directory of 1879 as millers at New Mills and the Tower Mill, Crook’s Place. John Robert Wells, born c.1835 and Frederick Rising Wells, born c.1850 were both sons of William Harrinson Wells and were born while the family were living in Dilham. In 1881, Frederick Rising Wells was given as a miller and corn merchant living at 5, Heigham Road, Heigham with his wife Ellen R., (31), son Frederick G. R. (8) and daughter Lillian (7). Wells Brothers were listed in Eyre’s Directory of 1883 as millers in Essex Street and New Mills Yard. The towermill was marked on the 1884 map. The Wells Brothers' partnership was dissolved on December 1884.


NOTICE is hereby given, that the Partnership lately subsisting between us, the undersigned, JOHN ROBERT WELLS, FREDERICK RISING WELLS and KATHARINE HICKS WELLS, carrying on business as Millers at the New Mills and Crook’s Place, in the City of Norwich, under the style or firm of “Wells Brothers,” has this day been dissolved by mutual consent so far as regards the said Frederick Rising Wells, who retires from the firm. All debts sue to or owing by the said late firm will be received and paid by the said John Robert Wells and Katharine Hicks Wells, who will continue the said business under the style or firm of “Wells Brothers.”
As witness our hands the eighteenth day of December, 1884
JOHN R. WELLS.
FREDERICK RISING WELLS
KATHERINE H. WELLS
Witness. G. CHRISR. DAVIES
Solicitor, Norwich.

Norfolk Chronicle - 27th December 1884


In 1885, Frederic Rising Wells appeared in Court for failing to repay a debt


NORWICH COUNTY COURT.
TUESDAY.

(Before His Honour, Judge Price.)
A LOAN OR A BET. – THOS ELLIS, jun, fruiterer, sued F. R. WELLS, miller, of Norwich, for the sum of £30, on money lent in November last on a promisory note. Mr. Blofeld appeared for the plaintiff who stated that he lent defendant the money – 20 sovereigns and 17 half sovereigns – for three months, at 5 per cent., on a promisory note, which defendant wished him not to negotiate, as he wanted to keep the fact from his partner. Defendant, for whom Mr. G. C. Davies appeared, denied that the note was given for the money lent; it was in respect of a bet which he had made with plaintiff (which by law was not recoverable). A Mr. Rayner was the medium of communication between him and the plaintiff, who was a bookmaker. Plaintiff, however, said that he only acted for defendant in betting matters on commission, and that defendant owed him £9 on account of these bets. His Honour declined to receive the evidence of Rayner, as he had been in Court all the time, and gave judgement for plaintiff, with immediate payment.

Norfolk Chronicle - 23rd May 1885


LAKENHAM, SOUTH HEIGHAM,
AND ST. CLEMENT.

TWO RESIDENCES, SHOPS, AND BAKE OFFICES, DWELLING-HOUSE, SHOP, AND WARE-ROOM, STABLES, AND COW-HOWSES
EXCELLENT BRICK TOWER WINDMILL,
FIFTY-FOUR HOUSES, MOST OF THEM HAVING GARDENS, TO BE SOLD IN 32 LOTS. THE ANNUAL INCOME FROM WHICH IS ABOUT £380.
Clowes and Nash are favoured with directions from the Representatives of the late Rev. J. H. Fisk, to Sell by the above advantageously situate PROPERTIES by Auction, on Tuesday, the 30 th day of November, 1886, at the Royal Hotel, Norwich, at Six for Seven o’clock in the Evening.

SOUTH HEIGHAM
Lot 21 – That very substantially-erected Brick Tower
WINDMILL
Stable, Cart Shed, Granaries, and Large Yard, in Essex Street, Crook’s Place.
Particulars may be obtained at the Auctioneer’s Offices, Bank Chambers, Norwich; or of the Vendor’s Solicitors.
OVERBURY AND GILBERT
Upper King Street, Norwich.

Norfolk Chronicle - 20th November 1886

Wells Brothers were listed in White’s Directory of 1887 as corn merchants and millers, New Mills Bridge and Crook’s Place mills. The brothers were individually listed as follows: - Frederick Wells, home Heigham Road; John Wells, home New Mills, Lower Westwick Street; John Robert Wells, home South Heigham; Julian Wells, home New Mills, Lower Westwick Street. Julian Trivanion Wells was born c.1840 in Dilham, Norfolk and in 1881 was given as living in Lower Westwick Street, St. Swithin with his brother Raymond A. Wells.


Crook's Place towermill is said to have been demolished circa 1890


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Nat Grid Ref TG22350800
 
1826 to 1890+
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